MEMORY PALACE

11. - 28. 10. 2018 (opening: Wednesday, 10. 10. 2018 at 6 p.m.)

Captain Lightfoot (Anneli Holmstrom, Emma Pratt, Kadie Salmon) & Christian Henninger, Nitish Jain, Bára Anna Stejskalová, Eva Urbanová

exhibition concept: Captain Lightfoot

graphic design: Jan Slabihoudek

At least since Wagner’s idea of Gesamtkunstwerk, which dates back more than 150 years, generations of artists have been attracted by the innovative potential of bringing together different art forms. The same is true of the Scottish artist-run collective Captain Lightfoot (Anneli Holmstrom, Emma Pratt and Kadie Salmon), for whom working in an interdisciplinary, collaborative fashion has become their second nature.

At the core of the Memory Palace project lie questions about the source, forms and limits of human creativity, and—first and foremost—a quest to experiment with the creative processes. Four young artists (Christian Henninger, Nitish Jain, Bára Anna Stejskalová and Eva Urbanová) from the Academy of Performing  Arts in Prague were invited to contribute to the project, which was launched by a four-day workshop in April 2018. Intensive artistic research and exchange followed until the Memory Palace exhibition slowly became to take shape.

A big part of the research was directed toward the inter-war avant-garde, drawing inspiration from Dada’s rupturing the link between art and artist’s controlled decision making, Surrealism’s automatic writing and focus on the unconscious, or Moholy-Nagy’s idea of the art object as the catalyst of an interactive event. The technique of „transcendental meditation“—as described and championed by David Lynch—has also served as an important source of ideas for the exhibition, together with sensory deprivation and meditative walks. Memory Palace combines the above mentioned historical references, while using the vocabulary of contemporary art.

The artworks on show are comprised of a series of fictive audios, photo montages and  assemblages of random objects collected by the individual artists during their meditative walks. The architecture of the exhibition is structured as a “memory palace“—an imaginary location in your mind where you can store mnemonic images. It follows a path created in order to store creative inspiration, memories and visual imagery.

Special thanks to:  Viktor Dedek, Robin Holmberg, Matěj Šenkyřík, Miro Tóth

Supported by: European Cultural Foundation (STEP Travel Grants)